15 January 2020

Highlights from AAS Nova: 29 December - 11 January 2020

Susanna Kohler, American Astronomical Society (AAS)

AAS Nova provides brief highlights of recently published articles from the AAS journals, i.e., The Astronomical Journal (AJ), The Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), ApJ Letters, ApJ Supplements, The Planetary Science Journal, and Research Notes of the AAS. The website's intent is to gain broader exposure for AAS authors and to provide astronomy researchers and enthusiasts with summaries of recent, interesting research across a wide range of astronomical fields.

Image of the Sun rising behind the Earth's horizon with the text "Discover what's new in the universe", the AAS Nova logo, and "aasnova.org" superposed.

The following are the AAS Nova highlights from the past two weeks; follow the links to read more, or visit the AAS Nova webpage for more posts.

9 January 2019
AAS 235: Day 4
This week we’re at the winter AAS meeting in Honolulu, HI. Here are the highlights from Day 4!

8 January 2019
AAS 235: Day 3
This week we’re at the winter AAS meeting in Honolulu, HI. Here are the highlights from Day 3!

7 January 2019
AAS 235: Day 2
This week we’re at the winter AAS meeting in Honolulu, HI. Here are the highlights from Day 2!

6 January 2019
AAS 235: Day 1
This week we’re at the winter AAS meeting in Honolulu, HI. Here are the highlights from Day 1!

5 January 2019
AAS 235: Welcome!
This week we’ll be bringing you updates from the 235th AAS meeting in Honolulu, HI.

3 January 2019
Learn About Astronomy Education in a New Ebook
How can we improve student learning in introductory astronomy courses? A new ebook lays out the evidence-based strategies.

31 December 2019
Selections from 2019: Habitable Zone Narrows for Complex Life
Recent research suggests that the number of planets able to support complex life may be much smaller than we initially thought.

30 December 2019
Selections from 2019: Connecting the Universe’s Large and Small Scales
New work proposes a connection between small, dense compact objects — some possibly filled with dark energy — and the universe’s growth.

Related Posts