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233rd AAS Meeting Event Descriptions

Please note: The workshops and events listed on this page are only those that require or allow registration through the meeting registration form. There may be other workshops and events during the meeting that are not listed here. See the online program for information on all events.

All workshop organizers, moderators, and attendees must be registered for the AAS meeting at which the workshop will take place. Those attending a workshop only and not the rest of the AAS meeting will be charged a one-day registration fee in addition to the individual workshop fee.


Workshops

Teaching Science Thought and Practices (Weekend Intensive)

Saturday & Sunday, 5-6 January | 8:00 am – 5:30 pm
Organizer: K. E. Saavik Ford, CUNY BMCC/American Museum of Natural History
Fee: $150
This hands-on, active-learning workshop will provide participants with a model for teaching undergraduates key topics in scientific thought and practices, including: proportional reasoning, control of variables thinking, experimental design, hypothesis testing, use of assumptions, observations and inferences, reasoning with data, and drawing conclusions from graphical display. Topics addressed here are rarely taught in-depth early in the formal undergraduate curriculum and are frequently learned only after several apprenticeship research experiences. Participants should plan to play with both lab equipment and data.

This workshop is based on the highly successful research preparation course developed for AstroCom NYC by Dennis M. Robbins and K. E. Saavik Ford. The course has educated 78 students (from 1st to 4th year science majors) at the City University of New York. Students completing the curriculum make notable gains on Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning, among other metrics. This will be a condensed, intensive version of a 5-day workshop previously offered at the American Museum of Natural History and similar to the workshop of the same name offered at the 221st AAS Meeting (January 2018).

Participants will also engage in supervised practice, teaching a single investigation during a 2 hour workshop offered to other AAS members during the regular AAS meeting, and followed by a 30 minute reflective review.

Open to faculty & postdocs (senior graduate students only with special permission and an advisor’s recommendation). Preference goes to participants invested in supporting undergraduate research, and/or at minority-serving institutions. Workshop organizers will provide opportunities for enrollees to develop local implementation plans and practice newly learned skills. Enrollees can expect continued, network-supported professional development for at least 1 year after the workshop. Lunch included.

AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Workshop: Resources & Techniques for Effective Outreach to Students & the Public (two-day workshop)

Saturday & Sunday, 5-6 January | 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Organizer: Rick Fienberg, American Astronomical Society
No Fee; Application Required
We invite advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and recent PhD’s to join the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, established to support early-career AAS members interested in doing outreach to K-12 students, families, and the public. The program is offering a two-day workshop at the 233rd AAS meeting in Seattle, Washington, during which you will:
  • Learn strategies and techniques to improve your presentation skills;
  • Learn to communicate more effectively with public and school audiences;
  • Learn to reach your audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language;
  • Learn to find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with schools, museums, parks, and/or community centers in your area;
  • Gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings;
  • Become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach (with mentorship available);
  • Have up to two nights’ lodging and two days’ lunches provided.

The workshop includes presenters from the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and the Pacific Science Center.

Participants will include graduate students, postdocs, and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of their PhD, and advanced undergraduates doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy. Early-career astronomers who are interested in doing outreach, but who haven’t done much yet, are encouraged to apply; we will have sessions appropriate for both those who have done some outreach already and those just starting their outreach adventures. We especially want to encourage the participation of members of groups that are underrepresented in science. If you’re interested and are not yet a member of the AAS, you may submit a membership application at the same time you apply for the workshop and register for the meeting.

Introduction to Software Carpentry (two-day workshop)

Saturday & Sunday, 5-6 January | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Organizer: AAS Committee on Employment
Fee: $100
Computing is an integral part of every aspect of astronomy and astrophysics, but most scientists are never taught how to build, use, validate, and share software. As a result, many spend hours or days doing things badly that could be done well in just a few minutes. The goal of the Software Carpentry Workshop is to change that. The tools presented at this two-day workshop will enable astronomers to spend less time wrestling with software and more time doing research with results that are easier to confirm, distribute, and update.

This workshop consists of short tutorials alternating with hands-on practical exercises and covers the core software skills needed to construct, use, verify, and share software in astronomy. Saturday’s tutorials will include shell automation, basic python programming, and code review. Sunday’s sessions will shift to more advanced python, including numerical- and astronomy-oriented computing, and version control with git. The workshop will be run by a team certified instructors and helpers. The course is aimed at astronomers at all stages of their education and careers who wish to learn computational tools to increase the reproducibility and efficiency of their work. The course will be taught with the assumption that participants have written or edited code in a language other than Python and can navigate directories using the shell command line. Knowledge of Git is not required. Registration is for both days.

The course is aimed at astronomers at all stages of their education and careers who wish to learn computational tools to increase the reproducibility and efficiency of their work. The course will be taught with the assumption that participants have written or edited code in a language other than Python and can navigate directories using the shell command line. Knowledge of Git is not required.

Participants will be required to bring their own laptops and to install software in advance of the workshop. Approximately one month prior to the workshop, instructors will contact participants to provide software requirements and collaborative troubleshooting. We encourage participants to apply their newly developed skills at the Hack Together Day. More information on the Software Carpentry project and the skills covered in the workshop can be found at software-carpentry.org.

The AAS Chandra/CIAO Workshop (two-day workshop)

Saturday & Sunday, 5-6 January | 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
Organizer: Antonella Fruscione, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Fee: $35
Chandra/CIAO workshops are aimed at helping users, especially graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and early-career researcher to work with Chandra data and the Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software.
Several workshops have been previously organized at the Chandra X-Ray Center (see http://cxc.harvard.edu/ciao/workshop/ for more details) and this is the first time a CIAO workshop is organized in connection with the AAS.

The workshop will feature talks on introductory and advanced X-ray data analysis, statistics, and topics in Chandra calibration. The workshop will also include hands-on sessions where students can practice X-ray data analysis following a workbook of CIAO exercises or perform their own analysis with members of the CIAO team ready to assist. Participants are required to bring their own laptop.

Saturday, 5 January | 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Organizer: Tom Donaldson, Space Telescope Science Institute
No Fee
NASA's Astrophysics Archives preserve many terabytes of multiwavelength images, catalogs, and spectra. While many astronomers are familiar with the web tools that are convenient for searching and visualizing these data, this workshop will introduce participants to the command-line data access tools that are becoming increasingly popular. We will use python to work through science scenarios that combine multiwavelength data from the HEASEARC, IRSA, NED, and MAST. Workshop organizers will also be available to help participants access NASA data sets for use on their own projects.

Proposal Writing: Using NASA ROSES as a Template for Success

Sunday, 6 January | 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Organizer: Christina Richey, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Fee: $10
The success of scientists depends upon their ability to obtain funding. One of the largest challenges is to create strong proposals. Using Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) from NASA as a template, this workshop will focus on teaching the audience key points to writing a successful proposal.

Session Goals: As a result of this session, participants will be able to understand the proposal writing, reviewing, and selection process for federally funded proposals, as well as help those who have previously submitted proposals improve their performance.

Session Teaching and Learning Practices: Proposal Writing Workshops help early career scientists, as well as those looking to improve their previous proposal performance. However, workshops have been limited to due time constraints and the location of those willing to organize and run these critical workshops. Dr. Richey (the organizer/speaker), while a contractor at NASA Headquarters, was able to do some workshops during ROSES Roll-Outs, which occurred primarily at NASA Centers. That presentation will be modified to be attractive to a more diverse audience, and will include information on review techniques for program beyond just ROSES.

The current presentation for the proposal writing workshops is 3-4 hours in length, with time for questions and interactive engagement from the audience, as literature shows that active learning environments are optimal (Review of Literature within the field by Prince, M. 2004). The workshop is a mixture of PowerPoint, Q&A, and will include time for hands-on activities. An anonymized survey will be included at the end to allow for general feedback in improving the workshop.

SOFIA Workshop for FORCAST and HAWC+ Data Analysis

Sunday, 6 January | 8:30 am – 5:15 pm
Organizer: Randolf Klein, USRA / SOFIA
No Fee 
The SOFIA Science Center offers an interactive workshop on SOFIA science data analysis. The workshop participants will work on scientifically highly relevant, recently obtained, publicly available data sets. Far-infrared polarimetry observations of 30 Doradus with by HAWC+ have been obtained in in July 2018. Mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the galactic star forming regions DR21 and W3 with FORCAST are planned for September 2018. These data sets are obtained in strategic director’s discretionary time and are made public immediately after the observation.

The workshop participants will learn how to work with and analyze HAWC+ polarimetric data as well as FORCAST imaging and spectroscopic data. Data analysis recipes will be provided before the workshop. Instructions for downloading the public data sets from the SOFIA data archives will also be distributed. During the workshop the participants can follow along the demonstration of the data analysis recipes on their own laptops and then explore the data on their own. During the demonstration and while the participants are exploring the data in the interactive part of the workshop, SOFIA scientists will be at hand to help with questions.

The goal of the workshop is to enable the community to work on SOFIA data from FORCAST and HAWC+ using the above mentioned public data sets and also to give the workshop participants a head start on analyzing these data sets. Workshop participants may try the demonstrated data analysis recipes on other, e.g. their own, data sets. The support at the workshop will focus on the analysis of the public data sets. Only limited support will be available for participant with issues specific to other data sets.

For any questions about the workshop, please contact sofia_help@sofia.usra.edu.

Using Python and Astropy for Astronomical Data Analysis

Sunday, 6 January | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Organizer: Kelle Cruz, ScienceBetter Consulting
Fee: $75
This workshop will cover the use of Python tools for astronomical data analysis and visualization, with the focus primarily on tools in the Astropy library and its affiliated packages. The goal is to introduce participants to the variety of tools which are available inside the Astropy library and to provide ample hands-on time during which participants will explore the science analysis capabilities which the greater Python environment and community provide. The format will be very interactive and include short presentations followed by instructor-guided tutorials where participants will use the tools be able to ask questions in the company of expert users and developers. Topics will include user configuration and conda environments; units, quantities, and constants; coordinates; FITS, ASCII, and Astropy tables; models; WCS and images; and point-source photometry. Finally, we will describe the various ways to get help from the Astropy community and ways to get involved with the Astropy Project.

CAE’s Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors

Sunday, 6 January | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Organizer: Edward Prather, University of Arizona
Fee: $35
Want to motivate students to become active participants in their learning? So do we! Developed over the past 15 years by working with thousands of instructors, postdocs, and graduate students, this workshop provides current and future instructors with authentic experiences in effectively implementing proven active learning strategies that significantly increase students’ understanding. We will introduce participants to a wide variety of classroom-tested instructional techniques and materials that motivate and empower students to engage in learning about the big ideas in Astronomy and Space Science.

This inclusive, supportive and active workshop environment provides first-hand experience with a range of instructional strategies including interactive lecturing, Think-Pair-Share, and collaborative group activities (including, Lecture-Tutorials, Ranking Tasks, and Student Representation Tasks). These instructional strategies are designed to increase students’ conceptual understandings as well as help them develop and improve their abilities to think critically, interpret graphs, reason about quantitative data, and improve their self-efficacy. Join your colleagues in learning more about how to transform your classroom into a vibrant learning environment with more motivated and confident learners!

We at CAE are continually evolving our professional development experiences based on the needs and recommendations of our workshop participants. If it’s been a while since you participated in one of our Teaching Excellence Workshops, we encourage you to come take part in this new experience!

CAE workshops have been hosted all around the country at universities, colleges, and national meetings of professional societies (such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers). By participating, you’ll become part of a nationwide community of practice, along with over 4000 past workshop participants and other educators of Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science. Our CAE online community of practice is dedicated to helping each other in a supportive online environment through advice and recommendations, as well as conversations about effective classroom strategies, interesting pedagogical resources, current science education research, and more.

Adding LISA to Your Astronomy Tool Box

Sunday, 6 January | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Organizer: Shane Larson, Northwestern University
Fee: $35
If you’re interested in the power of adding gravitational waves to your research, this hands-on workshop is for you. LISA will be a phenomenal astronomical observatory with a variety of sources ranging from degenerate stellar binaries to supermassive black holes to the Big Bang. Experts from the community will show how LISA data can be used to address unanswered questions in astronomy, followed by hands on activities and exercises using publicly available gravitational-wave tools. These tools are designed for use individual research problems. The day will conclude with an introduction to the LISA Consortium and strategies to become part of the international LISA community. The workshop is open to astronomers at all stages of their careers from students to faculty. Laptops are required and a working python knowledge is suggested.

Advanced Searching in the New ADS: On the Web and Using the API

Sunday, 6 January | 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Organizer: Kelly Lockhart, Astrophysics Data System, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 
No Fee
The new ADS interface has been the official face of the Astrophysics Data System for nearly a year. While it supports the same types of searches that could be done in the Classic system, it’s also capable of a whole lot more. Join us to learn more about the advanced search features in the web interface of the new ADS. We’ll also show you how to use our API to perform advanced searches programmatically, using command line tools and Python scripts. Completion of this workshop will enable you to get started with a project at the hackathon later this meeting or to start a bibliometric study of your own.

One-on-One Career Consultations (20-minute Sessions)

Monday, 7 January | 12:00 PM – 4:40 PM
Tuesday, 8 January | 9:00 AM – 5:40 PM
Wednesday 9 January | 9:00 AM – 5:40 PM
Organizer: Diane Frendak, American Astronomical Society
Fee: $20
Alaina Levine of Quantum Success Solutions, a career consultant, science writer, professional speaker, and comedian, will meet individually with attendees to provide confidential, customized career advice for people from student through mid-career. Attendees are encouraged to bring CV/resume, cover letter, or any other item you wish to have evaluated. Registrants will be contacted starting 10 October by facilitator to schedule their individual appointment.

The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to LEDs: Practical Solutions for Dark Sky Preservation in the LED Era

Monday, 7 January | 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Organizer: Jeffrey Hall, Lowell Observatory
Fee: $35
Communities around the world are switching to light emitting diode (LED) fixtures for outdoor lighting, and the default white LED solution almost everyone is employing will increase sky glow by a factor of anywhere from 2 to 4 over the widely-used high pressure sodium (HPS) standard. In this workshop, members of the AAS Committee on Light Pollution, Radio Interference, and Space Debris will provide you with a variety of practical information you can use in your community to advocate for more dark-sky friendly LED solutions. We’ll discuss the various types of LED lighting available and the relative impact on sky glow of these LEDs relative to current systems. We’ll explore success stories from cities and towns that have found better answers than the very high-temperature, blue-white LEDs we see popping up in so many locations. We’ll look at ways communities have engaged with citizens, city staff, and elected officials to make progress. And, you’ll have a chance to ask committee members questions and develop ideas for dark-sky LED solutions in your community. You’ll leave the workshop with a better perspective on this new lighting technology, as well as with a set of concrete takeaways you can apply to advocate for best dark-sky practices in your area. And just to make it fully irresistible, we’ll feed you lunch! Come join us for an informative, interactive session in Seattle, and you’ll leave much better equipped to help protect the source of all our data.

Marvin: Data Access and Visualization for the SDSS-IV/MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

Monday, 7 January | 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Organizer: David Law, Space Telescope Science Institute
Fee: $35
MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) is one of the three main surveys of the SDSS-IV program. MaNGA will provide integral field spectroscopy of an unprecedented sample of 10,000 galaxies. As part of SDSS, MaNGA data is being made public in annual data releases; DR15 is the third and most recent release of MaNGA data (and the first which includes maps of derived properties). DR15 also includes the release of Marvin to the public. Marvin is a new tool designed for streamlined access to the MaNGA data, optimized for overcoming the challenges of searching, accessing, and visualizing the complexity of the MaNGA dataset. At its core, Marvin provides user-unaware local/remote data access eliminating logistical overheads and delivering exactly the content you want, when you want it.

Marvin has two main components: a Web Interface, for a quick visual introduction into the world of MaNGA data, and a Python package of tools, for more in-depth scientific analysis and inclusion in your science workflow. This workshop serves as an introduction to Marvin for the astronomical community, by members of the Marvin Team. After an introductory presentation about MaNGA and Marvin, we will guide you through the setup for Marvin, and demonstrate its main features. Using the web interface, participants will learn how to visually navigate, search for, and inspect MaNGA galaxies. Using Python, participants will learn the ins and outs of all the programmatic tools, how to quickly access data files, query the dataset, and deep-dive into a more detailed analysis with a focus towards specific science use cases. By the workshop end, participants will have gained familiarity with the Marvin tool suite to begin exploring the MaNGA dataset for their science immediately. A break for coffee will be provided.

Teaching for Equity

Monday, 7 January | 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Organizer: Jessica Fielder, San Francisco State University
Fee: $20
This workshop is aimed at instructors who are working toward or looking to create learning environments that are inclusive, supportive, and rigorous, where diverse perspectives are represented, and students and faculty can thrive. Topics addressed are drawn from the Inclusive Astronomy recommendations for teaching and include: (1) identifying the strengths, weaknesses, needs, and resources our students bring to the classroom, including cultural capital (2) techniques for understanding and influencing classroom climate and dynamics, and (3) creating an affirming and accessible physical space. Workshop attendees who wish to apply these topics in other contexts (e.g., faculty/work group meetings, mentoring, etc.) are also welcome. We will learn from each other’s teaching and learning experiences as well as literature, and discuss structural and pedagogical practices that can help us advance toward these goals. The teaching practices presented will be research-informed and research-validated, with evidence of equitable outcomes for all intersections of student identities in terms of psychosocial shifts and academic success. Resources provided will include examples of: syllabus evaluation tools, classroom codes of conduct and “ground rules,” literature on social justice pedagogy, and formative and summative assessment tools. By the end of the workshop, participants will identify concrete changes they can make in their courses or departments and create an implementation and assessment plan.

Direct Connection to the Science with NASA’s Universe of Learning: Ways to Use Astrophysics Science to Support STEM Learning

Monday, 7 January | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Organizer: Emma Marcucci, NASA's Universe of Learning
The NASA’s Universe of Learning workshop at the 233rd AAS meeting is aimed at astronomers and educators who engage with audiences to enable STEM learning in informal learning environments - such as museums, science centers, planetariums, and libraries. During this workshop, we will provide a brief overview of the NASA’s Universe of Learning program, do interactive tutorials with attendees on selected STEM activities, and share additional resources from the program. We will present ways to connect these resources based on current astrophysics themes and learning pathways, and introduce ways in which you can help us deliver current and accurate NASA astrophysics content to audiences across our country.

NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven, learning-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is the result of a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University, and is one of 27 competitively-selected cooperative agreements within the NASA Science Mission Directorate’s Science Activation Collective.

The NASA's Universe of Learning team draws upon cutting-edge science and works closely with Subject Matter Experts (scientists and engineers) from across the NASA Astrophysics Physics of the Cosmos, Cosmic Origins, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. Together we develop and disseminate data tools and participatory experiences, multimedia and immersive experiences, exhibits and community programs, and professional learning experiences that meet the needs of our audiences, with attention to underserved and underrepresented populations.

AMPlifying Students’ Problem-Solving in Astronomy and Physics Majors’ Courses

Monday, 7 January | 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizer: Edward Prather, University of Arizona & Center for Astronomy Education
Fee: $35
Wish your astronomy and physics majors were better at problem-solving? Tired of experimenting with hit and miss strategies? Us too! We have developed a proven instructional model that effectively motivates student to work collaboratively on problem-solving during class and addresses their common learning difficulties. We’ve also created a framework to help you generate new problems that can empower your students to develop both their quantitative problem-solving abilities and conceptual understandings.

In this fun and inclusive environment we’ll introduce you to AMP, CAE’s Astrophysics Majors Project: a long-term endeavor designed to systematically improve how we teach our courses for physics and astronomy majors.

We at CAE are continually evolving our professional development experiences based on the needs and recommendations of our workshop participants. If it’s been a while since you participated in one of our Teaching Excellence Workshops, we encourage you to come take part in this new experience!

CAE workshops have been hosted all around the country at universities, colleges, and national meetings of professional societies (such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers). By participating, you’ll become part of a nationwide community of practice, along with over 4000 past workshop participants and other educators of Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science. Our CAE on-line community of practice is dedicated to helping each other in a supportive online environment through advice and recommendations, as well as conversations about effective classroom strategies, interesting pedagogical resources, current science education research, and more.

Co-organizers: Rica Sirbaugh French (MiraCosta College & Center for Astronomy Education) and Colin S. Wallace (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill & Center for Astronomy Education)

Careers 101: Career Planning Workshop and Panel for Graduate Students and Postdocs

Monday, 7 January | 9:30 am – 11:30 am
Organizer: Alaina Levine, Quantum Success Solutions
No Fee
This FREE workshop and panel discussion will center on the current and expanding crisis in the job and career market for astronomers. Specifically targeted towards graduate students and Postdocs, this workshop will identify and investigate the shortage of traditional astronomy jobs, and how early-career scientists can best prepare for this challenge. Our focus will be on career planning for traditional astronomy positions. We will demonstrate how to orchestrate a personal career plan and develop a Plan B and Plan C for contingencies. We will discuss what early-career astronomers should do now to enhance their CVs and research reputations, and what they should look for in and how they can leverage a Postdoc appointment to set themselves up for success in the field. We will also discuss non-traditional jobs and career paths in astronomy, and introduce the skills that are needed to pursue these. Q and A between panelists and workshop participants will be highly encouraged.

Career Hour - Networking for Nerds: Create Your Dream Career In Real Life (IRL) and via Social Media

Monday, 7 January| 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Organizer: Alaina Levine, Quantum Success Solutions
No Fee
Do you want to land your dream job? Get ready to network! Most jobs and other game-changing career opportunities are not advertised, and even if they are, there is usually a short-list of candidates already in mind. So how do you find out about and access the 90% of jobs and other opportunities that are "hidden"? In this session, we will focus on proven networking strategies and tactics to identify new opportunities, locate decision-makers within organizations, solidify your reputation and brand in the minds of those who hire, and gain access to hidden jobs and game-changing opportunities. Discover how networking and self-promotion, especially on social media, can enable you to land or even create your dream job from scratch! This career hour is organized by the AAS Employment Committee.

Teaching Science Thought and Practices (Brief Sample)

Monday, 7 January | 9:30 am – 11:30 am - Session I
Monday, 7 January | 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm - Session II
Tuesday, 8 January | 9:30 am – 11:30 am - Session III
Tuesday, 8 January | 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm - Session IV

Organizer: K. E. Saavik Ford, CUNY BMCC/American Museum of Natural History
Fee per session: $35
This workshop is a brief, 2 hour sample of the Teaching Science Thought and Practices (Weekend Intensive). If you are interested in the concept of Teaching Science Thought and Practices but cannot yet commit to a full weekend intensive, we strongly encourage you to sign up for this workshop instead. Also, if you are a graduate student interested in this topic, we encourage you to sign up for this workshop, rather than the Weekend Intensive.

This hands-on, active-learning workshop will provide participants with a model for teaching undergraduates key topics in scientific thought and practices, including: proportional reasoning, control of variables thinking, experimental design, hypothesis testing, use of assumptions, observations and inferences, reasoning with data, and drawing conclusions from graphical display. Topics addressed here are rarely taught in-depth early in the formal undergraduate curriculum and are frequently learned only after several apprenticeship research experiences. Participants should plan to play with both lab equipment and data.

This workshop is based on the highly successful research preparation course developed for AstroCom NYC by Dennis M. Robbins and K. E. Saavik Ford. The course has educated 78 students (from 1st to 4th year science majors) at the City University of New York. Students completing the curriculum make notable gains on Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning, among other metrics. This workshop will consist of a single lesson, representing a small sample of the curriculum, delivered by participants from the Weekend Intensive workshop by the same name, under the supervision of either Robbins or Ford.

Open to faculty, postdocs & graduate students. Preference goes to participants invested in supporting undergraduate research, and/or at minority-serving institutions. Workshop organizers will provide information for participants to develop the lesson for local implementation.

Skywatchers: Bringing Together Cultural and Scientific Knowledge of the Stars

Tuesday, 8 January | 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Organizer: Annette Lee, NASA Ames Research Center
Fee: $35
In the US, fewer than 40% of intended STEM majors actually graduate with a STEM degree. Reasons that students give for migrating away from STEM are: uninspiring introductory courses, difficulty in math, and an unwelcoming academic culture in STEM especially for underrepresented groups. Furthermore, women and minorities make up 70% of undergraduate students but only 45% of the STEM degrees (PCAST, 2012). Non-white participation in STEM is disproportionately low. This misalignment is critical.

We propose to design and deliver an innovate, active learning based, astronomy workshop, that offers tangible activities and strategies for ASTR101 instructors to increase cultural relevancy in their ASTR 101 classrooms, “Native Skywatchers: Bringing Together Cultural and Scientific Knowledge of the Stars.

This workshop builds on combined decades of experience in what we have come to call “dual-learning” – the weaving together of cultural and scientific knowledge, stories, and hands-on activities in an environment where neither is dominant over the other and resonance between the two is easily found. PI A. Lee’s Native Skywatchers initiative (http://www.nativeskywatchers.com) and Collaborator D. Scalice’s NASA and the Navajo Nation partnership (https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/education/nasa-and-the-navajo-nation/) form the basis of the pedagogical approach of dual-learning.

We will focus on three constellations—Wakinyan-Thunderbird, To Win/Tun Win-Blue Spirit Woman (Lee, 2014), and Maang-Loon (Lee, 2014)—grounding participants in their location in the night sky and the knowledge contained in their stories. Then, we will introduce astronomy and astrobiology concepts that correspond, relate, and resonate: Wakinyan-Thunderbird with precession; To Win/Tun Win-Blue Spirit Woman with stellar nucleosynthesis; and Maang-Loon with Solar System formation. In each case, we will introduce scientific hands-on activities/labs, and participants will work in groups to expand them to reflect and teach the cultural knowledge they learned.

How to Build and Publish a Website in 60 Minutes or Less: Developing Crucial Web Development Skills to Meet Professional and Academic Needs in the Digital Age

Tuesday, 8 January | 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Organizer: Mario Juric
No Fee
This workshop will teach you how to easily make a free, personal website all in 60 minutes or less! Personal websites are crucial for branding yourself online and ensuring that your peers can access your contact information and obtain information about your current research projects. While web development can seem daunting and complex, we will show you that you can create and host an amazing looking personal website for whatever purpose you can imagine at no cost to you. We will explore and discuss possible uses for personal websites, including as a staging area for your open source code and analysis tools, as a blog used to communicate your science to both your peers and the public, or as a location to host your teaching materials and to enable online learning. Workshop materials will be provided in a public GitHub repository after the workshop’s conclusion.

Beyond the Academy Career Hour: Transitioning to a Career in Data Science (Panel Discussion)

Tuesday, 8 January | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Organizer: AAS Employment Committee
No Fee
Data science is one of the most promising and popular non-academic career options for astronomers. However, while many young astronomers hear the message that data science is a possible employment outcome, they often do not hear the associated message of how to make the transition. This workshop aims to address this shortfall by featuring a panel of astronomers who have already made the transition. As there are numerous paths and entry points into data science, the panel will include 3-4 data scientists with a variety of transition experiences (such as little to no formal training, university training, or bootcamp training). Panelists will share their experiences on these different paths, describe the pros and cons of each, and answer questions from attendees. This career hour is sponsored in part by the American Institute of Physics.

The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC): A Model for a Robust Student Pipeline

Tuesday, 8 January | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Organizer: Jessica Harris, The National Radio Astronomy Observatory
No Fee
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)’s National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is an innovative, competitive, cohort-based student program designed to increase the number of students from underrepresented minority (URM) and underserved groups entering, and remaining in, STEM careers. The NAC program is funded by the National Science Foundation, and is led by the NRAO, in partnership with a number of HBCUs and research universities and facilities. The NAC model expands upon the traditional summer research experience by providing a year-long NAC internship, long-term mentoring, targeted financial and professional support, and engagement in a strong national-level peer and mentor network.

NAC students have enjoyed summer research experiences at the NRAO’s Charlottesville, VA and Socorro, NM sites, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Space Telescope Science Institute, and Princeton University. Participation in the NAC program is designed to continue to provide meaningful support to each NAC alumni through undergraduate school, through graduate school and/or into the student’s intended career.

Now entering its 7th year of programming, the NAC model has demonstrated significant success in achieving its goal of increasing the number of URM students entering graduate school in fields that support “full spectrum” astronomy (e.g., physics, engineering, astronomy).

The proposed session will describe the NAC/ model, provide examples of success metrics, and include a panel discussion with NAC mentors and student alumni.

Beyond the Academy Round Table Discussions and Career Fair

Tuesday, 8 January | 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizer: Diane Frendak, American Astronomical Society
No Fee; Registration Requested
To provide first-hand insight into the wide variety of career paths available to those with degrees and/or advanced training in the astronomical sciences, the AAS Employment Committee (EC) is convening representatives from various career arenas beyond research universities -- e.g., the aerospace and data science industries; national labs; science policy institutes/agencies; and small colleges -- for an hour of informal discussions with attendees of AAS 233.
Several career path representatives will be drawn from the panel at the associated Beyond the Academy Career Hour: Transitioning to a Career in Data Science, and the remainder will be AAS 233 attendees and exhibitors specifically recruited by the Committee so as to adequately cover the various career areas. Each representative will serve as a discussion lead at a round table in the exhibit hall's Career Center. After a brief welcome and introduction by the EC Chair, participants will be invited to choose among -- and circulate among -- the “Career Path Rep” tables as they see fit, sitting down to ask questions or just listening in to the conversation. The first hour will feature the round table event described above, followed by a 1-hour recruiting event, where job seekers can sign up for interviews with recruiters.

Helping AAS Members Help the World: A Workshop on Teaching Climate Change

Tuesday, 8 January | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Organizer: Travis Rector, University of Alaska Anchorage
Fee: $35
From a social, environmental, and political standpoint climate change is the most important scientific topic of our time. Fortunately astronomers are well positioned to make a difference. Introductory astronomy (i.e., “Astro 101”) classes are an effective way to teach climate change because they reach a large number of students and cover related topics. Public outreach, e.g., presentations in schools and planetariums, are also an important way to improve attitudes and understanding. Climate change is a difficult topic to teach because it spans a wide range of subject areas, from physics to psychology. It is also a controversial topic, meaning that simply knowing the science content is not enough to effectively teach it. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce: (1) resources that will improve their science content knowledge about climate change, (2) effective interactive and inclusive methods for teaching the topic in Astro 101 classes, and (3) established strategies for engaging the public. The workshop is sponsored by the AAS Sustainability Committee.

LSST Science Pipelines Stack Tutorial for AAS

Session 1 - Tuesday, 8 January | 9:00 pm – 12:00 pm
Session 2 - Tuesday, 8 January | 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Organizer: Suzanne Jacoby, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope
No Fee
The Large Synoptic Telescope (LSST) will capture about 20TB of data each night. This will be processed and cataloged and released to astronomers (and other scientists). The intention is to deliver not just the data but a Science Platform beside the data where scientists may interact with the data. This is greatly facilitated by JupyterHub, though we have other elements (high performance database, web apis and an exploration portal).

The processing itself is quite involved and we have a rather large code base (all public see https://github.com/lsst/). This stack tutorial is intended to familiarize Scientists and Researchers with our processing software and familiarize them with near the data processing concepts.

Career Hour - Interviewing: What You Need to Do Before, During, and After to Get the Job

Wednesday, 9 January | 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Find out what you need to know and do to get the job from the first moment of contact to the moment you leave the interview.

Hack Together Day

Thursday, 10 January | 8:30 am – 7:00 pm
Hack Together Day is a full-day workshop to work intensively on collaborative projects of interest to the Astronomical community. A wide variety of projects will be undertaken, spanning everything from software development to data exploration and analysis to creative outreach projects. Projects that take advantage of the unique gathering of enthusiasm and expertise at the Winter AAS Meeting are particularly encouraged. No hacking or programming experience is required; newcomers are extremely welcome! Project ideas and participants will be solicited before and during the meeting. Participants can lead or join any project, and should plan on focusing on accomplishing one, limited thing. In addition, we ask participants to commit to Hack Together Day for the entirety of the day.


Events

Student Orientation & Grad School Fair

Sunday, 6 January | 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Complimentary with meeting registration
Is Seattle your first AAS Meeting? Are you looking for a Graduate or Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program? Are you overwhelmed by the AAS Meeting? Or are you looking to connect with other students and faculty? Then the Student Orientation & Grad School Fair is for you! Visit with representatives from over 55 graduate schools and programs.

Opening Reception

Sunday, 6 January | 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Complimentary with meeting registration
Join your colleagues as we kick-off the 233rd AAS meeting in Seattle. This is a great time to network, socialize, eat, drink, and gear up for an exciting week. Turn in your raffle ticket for a chance to win prizes from local businesses and restaurants.

Career Networking & Job Fair

Tuesday, 8 January | 12:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Participating in the Career Networking & Job Fair is a great way to increase your visibility at the AAS Meeting. As a recruiter, you have the unique opportunity to meet and engage with outstanding candidates for the best recruiting opportunities. If your company is already an exhibitor at the meeting, there is no cost. Non-exhibiting companies can join us for the one-day Job Fair for $500. We will provide a 6' skirted table. Bulletin boards are available for an additional $65. Your organization will be acknowledged at the event, on the meeting website, and in the meeting program. Sign up to recruit at the Job Fair.

Educational Outreach Event for Seattle Area Students

Wednesday, 9 January | 11:30 am – 2:00 pm
Over 300 local middle- and high-schools students will visit the 233rd AAS Meeting to attend a talk by Dr. Emily Levesque, University of Washington. They will continue into the exhibit hall to participate in hands-on demonstrations with our exhibitors and outreach educators. Individual students or school groups can sign up to participate. If you would like to lead an activity in the exhibit hall, but are not exhibiting, we welcome your participation. Complete this form and we will contact you with more information.

Closing Reception

Thursday, 10 January | 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Complimentary with meeting registration
Join us one last time to say farewell to your colleagues until the next AAS meeting. Enter to win prizes from our exhibitors. Grand Prize: SBIG ST-i Color Camera.

Contributions

Rodger Doxsey Travel Prize Fund

Contribute up to $100 to the Rodger Doxsey Travel Prize Fund
The Rodger Doxsey Travel Prize — established through the support of his father, John Doxsey, and other friends, family, and colleagues — provides graduate students or postdocs within one year of receiving or receipt of their PhD a monetary prize to enable the oral presentation of their dissertation research at a winter meeting of the AAS.

Purchase Carbon Offsets

Contribute up to $100 to the purchase carbon offsets
Over 90% of the carbon emissions from a typical scientific meeting come from participant travel to the meeting. We are encouraging participants to contribute up to $100 towards the purchase of carbon offsets, which will be used for a variety of third-party certified projects to reduce carbon emissions. Offsets are not a panacea, but will go a small way towards compensating for the meeting's carbon footprint.
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