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The National Optical Astronomy Observatory invites letters of intent for Gemini Observatory Large Programs. Deadline: Friday, 3 February 2014.

Winners of the Chambliss student poster awards for the 223rd AAS meeting in Washington, DC, in early January will be announced next week, so stay tuned!

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama identified basic research and STEM education objectives for his proposed "year of action," two issues close to our hearts here at the AAS Executive Office.

At the 223rd AAS meeting, the Working Group on Astronomical Software and the Astrophysics Source Code Library sponsored a special session on code sharing as a follow-up to a meeting held a year earlier. Here's a brief report.

Solutions to problem sets in Peter Foukal's book Solar Astrophysics, along with some corrections to the text, are now available for free to instructors.

This new survey establishes a baseline for tracking changes in the composition, backgrounds, and job histories of AAS members, in what types of work they do, and in the perceived hurdles to working in astronomy and related fields.

The 305-meter William E. Gordon Arecibo radio telescope is the largest single-dish radio telescope on our planet. Proposals to use it for observations between 1 July and 31 December 2014 are due by 3 March.

This year CVD actually lasts two days: 25-26 March. The AAS aims to select 10 to 12 volunteers to come to Washington, DC to raise visibility and support for science. Sign-up deadline: 11 February.

Jim Ulvestad, director of the National Science Foundation's Division of Astronomical Sciences, reviews the NSF budget and looks ahead to what we can expect in 2014.

In this letter, Scott Tremaine argues that press releases touting results that “turn theory upside down” are damaging to public perceptions of scientific research.

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