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All Posts by Crystal M. Tinch

Franco Pacini (1939 - 2012)

Franco Pacini, professor of astrophysics at the University of Florence, Italy, died on January 26, 2012 due to complications from Parkinson’s disease. The news of his sudden death immediately spread across the astronomical community both in Italy and abroad leaving a deep sorrow.

Franco was born in 1939 in Florence, but grew up in Urbino, a jewel of the Italian Renaissance about 70 miles east of Florence as the crow flies, where he now lies buried in the family tomb.

AAS Electronic Announcement #229 — February 2012

CONTENTS:
1. AAS ELECTION WINNERS
2. 2012 AAS MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY
3. INTRODUCING THE AAS LABORATORY ASTROPHYSICS DIVISION
4. ANCHORAGE MEETING NEWS: REGISTER FOR ANCHORAGE
4A. ABSTRACT SUBMISSION
4B. ABSTRACT SORTING
4C. CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS!
4D. ANCHORAGE HOTEL INFORMATION
4E. STUDENT VIRTUAL FORUM IN ANCHORAGE
4F. INAUGURAL AAS TALENT SHOW SCHEDULED FOR ANCHORAGE MEETING
5. BOSTON MEETING PLENARY SESSION VIDEOS
6. 2012 CONGRESSIONAL VISITS DAY
7. COMMUNICATING WITH WASHINGTON
8. FRED RASIO NEXT EDITOR OF APJL
9. NSO OBSERVING PROPOSALS
10. NOAO SURVEY PROGRAM LETTERS OF INTENT DUE 15 February 2012
11. SPECIAL SESSION ON LIGHT POLLUTION AT THE BEIJING IAU GENERAL ASSEMBLY
12. ARECIBO CALL FOR PROPOSALS
13. 2012B NASA KECK CALL FOR PROPOSALS
14. NOAO CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR 2012B DUE
15. CALL FOR NOMINEES
16. AAS OPPOSES THE GRANT ACT OF 2011 (H.R. 3433)

James R. Arnold (1923 - 2012)

James R. Arnold, a Univ. of California, San Diego, nuclear chemist and visionary scientist, died at 88 on January 6, 2102 in La Jolla from complications of Alzheimer's disease. He was founding chairman of UC San Diego’s chemistry department and first director of the California Space Institute.

Harold Zirin (1929 - 2012)

Dr. Harold Zirin, an emeritus professor of astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology, died on January 3, 2012, in Pasadena after a long battle with debilitating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). His passion for solar astronomy led his undergraduate students in the 1970s to produce a comic book of him as an unassuming professor who became the super-hero “Captain Corona” whenever he stepped into a solar observatory.

Franklin E. Kameny (1925 - 2011)

Dr. Franklin E. Kameny died October 11, 2011, at the age of 86 of cardiac arrest. Kameny observed RV Tau stars and yellow semiregular variables from 1952 to1954, and his photoelectric measurements served as the basis of his Harvard Ph.D. thesis. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1956, Kameny taught astronomy for a year at Georgetown University. A US Army veteran during World War II, he was hired as an astronomer by the US Army Mapping Service in 1957. His astronomical career was terminated when he was fired from this position due to the discovery of his sexual orientation.

Howard B. Anderson (1914 - 2010)

Howard B. Anderson passed away Saturday, May 15, 2010, in Hancock, MI, at the age of 95. Of Swedish ancestry, he was born December 13, 1914, in Escanaba, MI, a son of Oscar and Edla Anderson. He later moved to Bark River and to Iron Mountain, MI, where he graduated from High School. As a youth he was interested in all things scientific and electronic and he made a hobby out of building radios.

Patrick L. Nolan (1952 - 2011)

Patrick Lee Nolan died at his home in Palo Alto, California, on November 6, 2011, from complications related to a brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, which had been diagnosed less than five months earlier. He was born in Colusa, California, on November 18, 1952. Pat was the only child of John Henry Nolan and Carol Lee Harris Nolan. For most of his childhood they lived in Grass Valley, California, where his father was a butcher and his mother was a surgical nurse. Pat graduated from the California Institute of Technology in 1974 with a B.S. in Physics and completed a Ph.D.

William H. Smyth (1969 - 2011)

Bill Smyth passed away on September 30, 2011, as a result of complications from a respiratory infection after a 6-week battle waged in Wake Forest hospital in Salem, North Carolina. His pioneering work on planetary exospheres and atmospheres contributed significantly to the understanding of the smaller bodies in the solar system and their interactions with the surrounding charged particle and electric and magnetic fields environment.

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