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My last two columns have looked at some issues related to the Society’s publishing business model. In July, I wrote an overview of the Open Access advocacy that has been taking place all year.

Four years ago U.S. astronomers made a significant discovery: the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center, where the AAS gathered for its 213th meeting.

By the time you read this column, the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting for 2012 will be history and the results will no doubt be bouncing around the Internet.

From close-up pictures of water-sculpted pebbles on Mars, to the detection of galaxies at the boundary of the Dark Ages, discoveries in our field continue to advance our understanding of the Universe and to fascinate legions of the public who support our inquiry.

Vacancies for AAS Prize committees will be filled by Council at its meeting in Long Beach, California in January 2013. Current committee members are listed under “Committees” on the AAS homepage, http://aas.org/comms.

The AAS is sad to announce the passing of former AAS Vice-President Gart Westerhout. When the AAS incorporated in Washington, DC, Dr. Westerhout signed the Articles of Incorporation. He was a life-long supporter of the AAS. 

This program is administered by the National Solar Observatory (NSO), sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE), and is open to US graduate students in any discipline of astronomy or astrophysics who are US citizens or permanent r

The current deadline for submitting observing proposals to the National Solar Observatory is 15 November 2012 for the first quarter of 2013. Information is available from the NSO Telescope Allocation Committee at P.O.

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