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Our testimony outlines how we view the astronomical sciences as an integral part of what policymakers and advocates often refer to as our national “innovation ecosystem.”

The Congress’ two week recess—time lawmakers spend at home in their states/districts—comes to an end on Monday (28 April 2014). When we last left off in this space (much too long ago) we were discussing how the President's Budget Request (PBR) for FY 2015 came into being over the last year and a half or so.

Today's post is written by AAS member, Ramin Skibba, who participated in the 2014 AAS Congressional Visits Day Program.

Last week, I participated in the Congressional Visits Day (CVD) with the American Astronomical Society (AAS)...

All of our current and former John N. Bahcall Public Policy Fellows gathered for lunch with fellowship benefactor (and former AAS Vice-President) Neta Bahcall.

Each year, the federal budget process kicks off with the introduction of the President's Budget Request. Or rather, that's where it seems to begin for those of us looking from the outside in.

On March 4th the Obama Administration rolled out the top-line information on their budget request for FY 2015, which begins 1 October 2014. Details below the top line and a handful of policy bullet points will follow shortly.

We are looking at a potentially busy spring and summer for federal policies related to the astronomical sciences. In lieu of a deep dive into any one of the interesting policy issues on the horizon, I thought I would just lay out what we're likely to see and approximately when.

On Thursday, 6 February 2014, I walked around Capitol Hill delivering a letter from our President, David Helfand, to the leadership of the Appropriations subcommittees with jurisdiction over NASA, NSF, and the Department of Energy (DOE)—the three agencies that collectively provide most of the federal support for the astronomical sciences.

In response to a question that passed through my Twitter feed the other day and because they are holding a meeting 3-4 February 2014, I thought I would put together an answer to the question, "What is the AAAC?," which hopefully draws out a little more about the broader "astronomy policy ecosystem."

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama identified basic research and STEM education objectives for his proposed "year of action," two issues close to our hearts here at the AAS Executive Office.

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