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David Helfand reviews the current state of our journals, which is excellent, and argues for improving it further by including links in ApJ and AJ articles to the data that underlies a paper's conclusions.

The AAS will cease publication of AER at the end of 2013; the journal's full archive will remain available online. A task force will be created to develop ideas for expanding the Society's investment in other types of astronomy-education activities.

Kevin Marvel reports on the Journals Futures Workshop, which considered ApJ and AJ in light of the ongoing communications revolution, and offers some thoughts on AAS staff training, our impending office relocation, and his upcoming mini-sabbatical.

The American Astronomical Society and its six divisions (Planetary Science, High Energy Astrophysics, Solar Physics, Dynamical Astronomy, Historical Astronomy, and Laboratory Astrophysics) are deeply concerned about the impact of the Administration’s new conference travel restrictions on the scientific productivity and careers of researchers who are Federal employees and contractors.

The results of the latest AAS election are presented below. The Society thanks all who agreed to stand for election, for their commitment and service to the community, and congratulates the winners.

As I noted in my opening remarks at the 221st meeting of the Society in Long Beach, the state of the AAS — unlike that of the nation — is strong. We ended the year with a small positive balance in the Society's account for the fourth year in a row.

 The following actions were taken by the AAS Council at their January 2013 meeting in Long Beach, California.

My last two columns have looked at some issues related to the Society’s publishing business model. In July, I wrote an overview of the Open Access advocacy that has been taking place all year.

The AAS is sad to announce the passing of former AAS Vice-President Gart Westerhout. When the AAS incorporated in Washington, DC, Dr. Westerhout signed the Articles of Incorporation. He was a life-long supporter of the AAS. 

There have always been data in the journals, in the form of tables and images. Much of the data that the journals handle is explicitly tabular, and is therefore easy to exchange and manage using the wide array of mature systems available to the community.

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