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Effective in 2015 the Astronomical Journal and the Astrophysical Journal, ApJ Letters, and ApJ Supplement Series will become electronic only and will no longer be available in paper editions.

If you paid your 2014 AAS dues by the end of 2013, you qualified for 15% off your share of the author charges for one paper accepted for publication this year in any of the AAS journals. Here's how to claim your discount.

This article summarizes a presentation given by Greg Schwarz, the AAS Journals Editorial Scientist, at the 23rd Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems (ADASS) meeting.

With Executive Officer Kevin Marvel on sabbatical, other managers on the AAS staff are taking turns writing this column. In this installment, Chris Biemesderfer, Director of Publishing, describes the ongoing evolution of the AAS journals in the digital age.

David Helfand reviews the current state of our journals, which is excellent, and argues for improving it further by including links in ApJ and AJ articles to the data that underlies a paper's conclusions.

The AAS will cease publication of AER at the end of 2013; the journal's full archive will remain available online. A task force will be created to develop ideas for expanding the Society's investment in other types of astronomy-education activities.

Kevin Marvel reports on the Journals Futures Workshop, which considered ApJ and AJ in light of the ongoing communications revolution, and offers some thoughts on AAS staff training, our impending office relocation, and his upcoming mini-sabbatical.

My last two columns have looked at some issues related to the Society’s publishing business model. In July, I wrote an overview of the Open Access advocacy that has been taking place all year.

There have always been data in the journals, in the form of tables and images. Much of the data that the journals handle is explicitly tabular, and is therefore easy to exchange and manage using the wide array of mature systems available to the community.

There have always been data in the journals, in the form of tables and images. Much of the data that the journals handle is explicitly tabular, and is therefore easy to exchange and manage using the wide array of mature systems available to the community.

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