35th Meeting of the AAS Division on Dynamical Astronomy, April 2004
Session 7 Posters II
, Thursday, April 22, 2004, 7:00-8:30pm,

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[7.08] Neptunian Satellites observed with Keck AO system

F. Marchis, R. Urata, I. de Pater (UC-Berkeley), S. Gibbard (LLNL), H.B. Hammel (Space Science Institute), J. Berthier (IMCCE)

The Neptunian system was observed on 9 different nights between July 2002 and October 2003 with the 10-m Keck telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and its facility instrument NIRC2 coupled with the Adaptive Optics system. Data were recorded in J (1.2\mum), and H (2.2\mum) bands. The angular resolution achieved on a one-minute integration time image is ~0.50 arcsec, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 1100 km. The images display small structures such as the rings (de Pater et al. 2004), clouds in the atmosphere (Gibbard et al. 2003), and inner satellites, mainly Proteus, Larissa, Galatea, Despina, and Thalassa. On the 40 images, the positions and intensities of the satellites detected were accurately measured fitting the signal with a gaussian profile. The center of Neptune was obtained by fitting the disk position with an ellipse. After correcting for the detector distortion, we compared the satellite positions with the predicted ones delivered by several ephemerides. We used the JPL (NEP016 + NEP022 + DE405) and two IMCCE ephemerides, an old version (VSOP87+Owen et al., 1991) and a more recent one (DE405+Le Guyader et al., 1993). All cases, we confirmed the presence of an apparent shift between the predicted and the observed positions. Table 1 (see http://astron.berkeley.edu/~fmarchis/Science/Neptune/Satellites/) summarizes the mean distance of the shift for satellites most frequently observed and the various ephemerides. In this presentation, we will report the positions of the satellites, and present their color and possible photometric variations derived from the observations.

This work has been partially supported by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST - 9876783.

If you would like more information about this abstract, please follow the link to http://astron.berkeley.edu/~fmarchis/Science/Neptune/Satellites/. This link was provided by the author. When you follow it, you will leave the Web site for this meeting; to return, you should use the Back comand on your browser.

The author(s) of this abstract have provided an email address for comments about the abstract: fmarchis@astron.berkeley.edu

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Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 36 #2
© 2004. The American Astronomical Soceity.