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AAS Electronic Notification Service - Announcement #6

AAS Electronic Notification Service - Announcement #6
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CONTENTS

  1. Public Policy - Election Results Bring Uncertainty for Science
  2. Child Care Services at Tucson Meeting
  3. GSFC Workshop on Small Satellites - Feb. 8-9,1995
  4. NASA Astrophysics Data Program (ADP) Changes Types Proposals due Jan 25.
  5. NSF Target Dates for Proposals - No more Hard Deadlines
  6.  NSF GONG Helioseismology Data Proposals for Use of Data to be Accepted
  7. The VSOP and RadioAstron Space VLBI Missions Project Information Available on WWW
  8. Workshop on High Velocity Neutron Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts March 15-17, 1995, San Diego
  9. AAS Directory Institutional Update for U. Maryland

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Although the schedule has slipped during our busy season as we prepare for the Tucson meeting, our plan is to mail the AAS electronic announcements about the 10th of every month, or more often if news items are deemed by the Executive officer to be sufficiently important.

Items for possible inclusion in this announcement series should be sent to astronews@aas.org. Keep announcements short (no more than 250 words) and refer readers to sources of additional information.

Comments to pboyce@aas.org

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1. ELECTION FALLOUT

The transition from Democrat to Republican control of Congress is just getting under way. The Republicans talk about accomplishing a great deal within a very short time. Yet, the scene within the Congressional committees is still very chaotic. Staff will be changing, but it is unclear how many of the old staff will be retained (most will probably have to leave) or even how many staff each subcommittee will have.

One thing has emerged; there is a rhetoric race in progress. Both Democrats and Republicans are threatening to make drastic budget cuts, without cutting entitlements. The Republicans want to build up the military. Both sides have promised tax cuts for the "average" person. The math doesn't add up.

Traditionally, the term would not actually start until late January, allowing some time for newcomers to get settled. This year Speaker Newt Gingrich has a full slate of activities starting on Jan. 3 and continuing for the forseeable future. The pressure to act fast will be enormous. With all the new Congressmen in town, and with committee and personal staff not being particularly familiar with how to operate in their new environment, one could speculate that a number of hastily conceived actions could come out of the first few days of the new Congress.

Will the new Congress support science? Will the Administration have to cut back on science along with everything else? We do not yet know. The only sure thing is that this will be a year quite unlike anything we have seen in the last three decades.

It will pay us all to stay attuned to developments in Washington. The new Congressmen will probably listen more closely to their constituents than long time residents of Capitol Hill who might be feeling secure in their seat (although this is less likely than it was before November). And new Committee staff will probably have to learn from scratch what NSF and NASA are all about, and why they are vital to maintaining the US strength in science and technology.

Needless to say, the excitement over the SL-9 impact on Jupiter and the Hubble repair mission and subsequent discoveries has even reached within the beltway. Washington is sensitive to astronomy right now. This would be an important time to visit your own Congressional representatives and educate them about astronomy and what it means in their district.

We will try to keep you apprised of important events through this service, but a good way to stay informed is to subscribe to FYI, the AIP information series which is delivered by e-mail.

You may subscribe to FYI using AIP's automated listserver. Send an e-mail message to "listserv@aip.org" and type "add fyi" as the body of your message. The listserver will pick up your e-mail address from the header of your message. If you wish to add a different e-mail address than the one in your header, write "add `e-mail address' fyi" as the message.

Peter B. Boyce
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2. THERE WILL BE CHILD CARE SERVICES AT THE TUCSON MEETING

The LOC is prepared to make childcare services available to families attending the 185th Meeting of the AAS in Tucson, AZ, on the full days of the meeting, 9, 10, & 11 January, from 8:30 a.m. to, roughly, 6:00 p.m. These services will be available in the Agate Room of the Tucson Community Center, which is near the poster session and the registration areas.

The service-provider, Ms. Holly Nichols, is a CPR-qualified teacher with abundant experience (tel. 1-602-323-6612, for additional information or queries). Her fee for providing the services, detailed below, is $4 per hour, payable directly to Ms. Nichols. The LOC will not apply any surcharge.

The services to be provided during each day of operation are: 1) two art projects; 2) a session of singing; 3) a session of movement; 4) storytimes; and, 5) two snacks (one morning, one afternoon), composed of at least two food groups.

Ms. Nichols will also provide puzzles, board games, coloring books, and crayons.

For an extra $2 per child, Ms. Nichols will also provide lunches, the menues for which are scheduled tentatively as follows: Monday, 9 Jan - pizza; Tuesday, 10 Jan - a sandwich and drink from "Eegee's"; Wednesday, 11 Jan - bean & cheese burritos.

If anyone is interested in taking advantage of these services, they must reply to this notice no later than 2300 UT, Thursday, 5 January 1995 (or the sooner, the better), by emailing Dr. R.E. White
(rwhite@as.arizona.edu) the following information: 1) the name of the person(s) requesting the service, 2) the names of the child(ren) involved, and 3) their age(s).

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3. ***** FIRST GODDARD WORKSHOP ON SMALL SATELLITES *****

***** PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT *****


At the suggestion of our Visiting Committee, the Space Sciences Directorate of the Goddard Space Flight Center will be sponsoring informal workshops on issues relevant to the conduct of
space science. These workshops are meant to promote the free exchange of ideas and information among members of the total staff of the GSFC (not just GSFC scientists) and the space science community.

In view of the imminent release of the next NASA solicitation for Explorers, it seems appropriate to devote this first workshop to the manner in which Explorer project management and operations should be performed in the future, for the benefit of Space Physics and Astrophysics, in particular. The workshop will be conducted at the GSFC on Wednesday-Thursday, February 8-9, 1995.

This announcement is meant to alert you to the fact that the workshop is being planned to occur only five weeks from now. The next mailing, with detailed agenda and registration information,
will be sent to those E-mail addresses sending any response at all to this message at the following E-mailbox:

***** science@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov *****

With apologies for the very short fuse,

Steve Holt
Director of Space Sciences

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4. THE ASTROPHYSICS DATA PROGRAM (ADP) CHANGES TYPES!

BY: Jim Schombert (JPL/NASA HQ, Guenter Rielger (NASA HQ) and Sethanne Howard (JPL/NASA HQ)

The Astrophysics Data Program began in 1986 as the "Space Astrophysics Data Analysis Program". The purpose of the ADP is to optimize the scientific return from space astrophysics missions and to enable broad scientific investigations requiring analysis of data from one or several space-based data sets. The NASA Research Announcement was released October 25, 1994. Proposals are due January 25, 1995. A scientific peer review will evaluate the proposals with the goal of announcing selection by April 1, 1995.

During the 1995 proposal cycle, two types of proposals will be considered. This is a change from previous funding cycles which considered three types of proposals.

OLD WAY
Type 1: Proposals for research involving space astrophysics data sets.
Type 2: Proposals for applied research to improve and enhance space-based observing and data analysis
Type 3: Proposals for applied research to improve access to and management of space-based astronomical data.

NEW WAY TYPE
TYPE 1: Proposals for archival research involving space-based astrophysics data sets.
TYPE 2: proposals for applied research to improve and enhance space-based astrophysical observing and data analysis and to improve access to and management of space-based
astronomical data.

The old Type 2 and 3 Proposals are combined into a new Type 2. Participation in this program is open to all categories of organizations, domestic or foreign, including educational institutions,
profit and nonprofit organizations, NASA centers, and other Government agencies.

Proposals may be submitted at any time during the period ending January 25, 1995. All forms are available through anonymous file transfer protocol from Internet host ftp.astrophysics.hq.nasa.gov. ASCII, Postscript, and Microsoft Word files for all Appendices and required forms are in the directory "/pub/NRAs/ADP/94-OSS-17". In addition, a file named "README" resides in this directory and gives detailed instructions on obtaining the necessary files electronically.
 
The Type 1 proposals are those whose dominant emphasis is the analysis and interpretation of data from the above-mentioned space astrophysics missions. The Type 2 proposals may include the writing of algorithms for analyzing data, planning space-based astronomical observations, correlating or displaying space-based astronomical data; deconvolving sources in crowded fields, absolute radiance calibration techniques, statistically modeling the appearance of the sky in specific wavelength regions, providing tools for the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED); improving or adding reduction or analysis packages to any of the Astrophysics Science and Data Centers or to Astronomical Data Reduction and Analysis Systems; or other similar software activities. In addition, Type 2 proposals may include research to improve access to and management of space-based astronomical data.

A more significant change to the program concerns the peer review of proposals. In the past the Type 1 proposals were considered in competition only with each other for funding. Similarly for Type 2 and Type 3. This new cycle will put all proposals, regardless of type, into the same competitive base. This new procedure will ensure that all proposals share and are judged on the common goal of improving the scientific ouput from NASA Astrophysics mission data.
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5. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF) TARGET DATES

For several years the NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences has had a deadline for receipt of proposals in the Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics (SAA) Program. The Division has recently decided to move to target dates, rather than deadlines. AST will stagger the target dates to permit more efficient internal processing. Unlike deadlines, there will be no cutoff for receipt of proposals beyond these target dates, but late proposals cannot be assured of receiving attention as promptly as those received earlier.

Effective in calendar year 1995, the deadline for the SAA Programs is abolished, and target dates are instituted for the following Programs:

Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics: Target Date July 1, 1995

Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology: Target Date August 1, 1995

Galactic Astronomy: Target Date September 1, 1995

Planetary Astronomy: Target Date September 1, 1995

Target dates for these Programs will remain in effect in these same months in future years.
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6. PROPOSALS RELATED TO GONG HELIOSEISMOLOGY DATA


The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Project has begun the deployment of the six site, world-wide network of Doppler imaging instruments also known as the GONG. The first GONG data (from a three site network) are expected to become available in the late Spring of 1995.

In order to exploit these data in an expeditious manner, the Divisions of Astronomical (AST), Atmospheric (ATM), and Mathematical (DMS) Sciences are prepared to accept proposals at
this time for analysis and theory in helioseismology. We expect to make available at least $700,000 which would result in 10 to 15 awards. We especially wish to encourage the submission of proposals for analysis and interpretation of the initial GONG data, and the development of computational methods and techniques related to utilizing the GONG helioseismology data base.

Proposals will be administered within the Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics Program of AST, the Solar-Terrestrial Program of ATM and the Applied Mathematics and the Computational Mathematics Programs in DMS. Reviews of the proposals will be conducted jointly by these Programs.

Proposals should be submitted to the Division of Astronomical Sciences which will coordinate the review. Proposals should be in the standard format set forth in the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (NSF 94-2). Single copies of this brochure are available at no cost from the NSF Forms and Publications Unit, phone (703) 306-1128, or via e-mail (Internet: pubs@nsf.gov). We urge you to submit proposals as soon as possible, but no later than March 1, 1995. We plan to conduct a review of the proposals jointly with ATM and DMS shortly after that date.

For technical information on the GONG network and procedures for access to the GONG data, please contact John Leibacher at (gong@noao.edu), ((602) 325-9305) or FAX (602) 321-3400. GONG information and Project status are also available on Internet. The GONG home page is (http//helios.tuc.noao.edu/gonghome.html).

For programmatic information concerning the proposal process please contact Jane Russell( jrussell@nsf.gov) in Astronomical Sciences, David Sime (dsime@nsf.gov) in Atmospheric Sciences and Deborah Lockhart (dlockhar@nsf.gov) or Michael Steuerwalt (msteuerw@nsf.gov) in Mathematical Sciences.

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7. THE VSOP AND RADIOASTRON SPACE VLBI MISSIONS

The Astrophysics Division of NASA is providing support for the VSOP and RadioAstron Space VLBI missions through the efforts of JPL and NRAO. VSOP will be launched by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in 1996, while RadioAstron is scheduled for launch by the Russian Astro Space Center in 1997 or 1998. Radio telescopes with diameters of 8-10 meters, operating at 1.6, 4.8, and 22 GHz (plus 0.3 GHz for RadioAstron) will be placed in elliptical orbits with apogee altitudes of approximately 22,000 km (VSOP) and 77,000 km
(RadioAstron). Ground radio telescopes will co-observe with the orbiters to create a synthetic aperture roughly the size of the spacecraft orbit. Science possible with these instruments includes extremely high resolution (as fine as 40 microarcsecond) images of celestial objects (e.g., active galactic nuclei, H2O masers, and other high brightness temperature radio sources). Both VSOP and RadioAstron will be open to all scientific proposals.

For more detailed information on the missions, consult the JPL Project Home Page on the World Wide Web: http://sgra.jpl.nasa.gov

or stop by our booth in the exhibition hall at the Tucson AAS meeting in January. JPL also publishes a series of 1-page newsletters which is distributed via electronic mail, and also is available via the JPL Space VLBI Home Page. The main function of the JPL newsletter is to keep the U.S. astronomical community apprised of important information about VSOP and RadioAstron which will help astronomers make the best use of those missions. During the first year, it will emphasize material related to the first VSOP Annoucement of Opportunity, scheduled for release in May 1995, and the information necessary to submit successful proposals. To subscribe to this newsletter, if you have not already done so, simply send electronic mail to svlbi-request@sgra.jpl.nasa.gov with the single word SUBSCRIBE on the first line of the message.

Both the VSOP and RadioAstron projects also publish their own electronic newsletters, containing information specific to their missions. To subscribe to other mission newsletters, send electronic mail to the following addresses:

VSOP: pge@orihime.isaslan1.isas.ac.jp
RadioAstron: lgurvits@nfra.nl OR gabuzda@sci.fian.msk.su
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8. WORKSHOP ON HIGH VELOCITY NEUTRON STARS AND GAMMA RAY BURSTS

15 -- 17 March 1995
University of California, San Diego

This workshop will focus on the major breakthrough in our understanding of some, if not all, gamma ray bursters that has resulted from two very exciting recent developments -- the evidence
suggesting that most neutron stars are born with high velocities -- and the apparent identification of the three known soft gamma ray bursters with young, (high velocity?) neutron stars still associated with supernova remnants. Multiwavelength observations are providing a wealth of new information about the nature of these sources, which may have important implications for the origin of all gamma ray bursts.

Invited and contributed talks will cover the following topics:

HIGH VELOCITY NEUTRON STARS --
SOFT GAMMA RAY BURSTERS --
CLASSICAL GAMMA RAY BURSTERS --

If you wish to attend please respond soon, because the facility capacity will limit attendance to about 50.

A modest registration fee will cover conference proceedings, &c.

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*** CUT HERE AND SEND TO WORKSHOP@MAMACASS.UCSD.EDU ***
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PRELIMINARY RESPONSE

WORKSHOP ON HIGH VELOCITY NEUTRON STARS AND GAMMA RAY BURSTS

15--17 March 1995

University of California, San Diego

 

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workshop@mamacass.ucsd.edu

OR (IF NECESSARY) BY FAX TO (619)534-2294

OR (AS A LAST RESORT) BY MAIL TO

R. Rothschild, CASS 0111, Univ. of California,
9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0111, USA
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9. AAS MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY INSTITUTIONAL UPDATE

The phone number for the Astronomy Department at the University of Maryland found on page 202 of the 1995 Directory should be 301-405-3001. Please make a note of it.

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