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Contents:

1. AUSTIN MEETING NEWS
1a. Austin Hotel Information
1b. Program Ads
1c. Austin Professional Development
1d. Splinter Meetings
1e. Austin Education Workshops
1f. Volunteers Needed for Austin Meeting
2. ANCHORAGE MEETING SPECIAL SESSION AND TOWN HALL PROPOSAL DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 1 DECEMBER!
3. AAS ELECTRONIC VOTING
4. AAS JOURNAL REPRINTS GO DIGITAL ONLY
5. SMALL RESEARCH GRANT DEADLINE
6. IAU SYMPOSIA DEADLINE FOR 2013
7. NEEDED: JUDGES FOR CHAMBLISS STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS
8. JOB CAREER CENTER
9. ASTRONOMY FOR DEVELOPMENT
10. AAS MEMBER BENEFIT: HERTZ CAR RENTALS
11. JWST PROGRAMMATIC UPDATE
12. NSO OBSERVING PROPOSAL DEADLINE 15 NOVEMBER 2011
13. KAVLI PRIZE 2012 NOMINATIONS
14. CARMA CALL FOR SEMESTER 2012A OBSERVING PROPOSALS
15. VISITING SCIENTISTS IN ASTROPHYSICS AT NASA HQ
16. INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH EXPERIENCE FOR US GRADUATE STUDENTS (IRES)
17. BRACEWELL RADIO SUNDIAL
18. AAS SEEKS VOLUNTEER FOR USNC REPRESENTATIVE TO URSI


1. AUSTIN MEETING NEWS

Important Deadlines:
Regular Registration Deadline: 17 November 2011
Abstract Submission Deadline: 5 October 2011, 9:00 pm ET
Late Registration: 18 November - 20 December 2011
Childcare Grants: 1 December 2011
Late Abstract Submission: 1 December 2011, 9:00 pm ET
Splinter Meeting Requests: 1 December 2011
Hotel Reservations: 4 December 2011
Onsite Registration: 21 December 2011 - 12 January 2012

Register by Friday, 17 November 2011 and save up to $70. Registration rates will increase 18 November.

Register online at aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.

Austin Scientific Program Online
The full Scientific Schedule for the Austin meeting can now be viewed online at http://www.abstractsonline.com/plan/start.aspx?mkey={25369F54-5CB0-4639-BC20-B20273090B9A}.


1a. Austin Hotel Information

The AAS has secured great rooms at great rates at the following hotels
(some even include breakfast!):

Hilton Austin
500 East 4th Street, Austin, TX, 78701
Toll free: 1-800-236-1592
Local: 512-482-8000

Standard Group Reservations
http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/groups/personalized/A/AUSCVHH-STR-20120107/index.jhtml?WT.mc_id=POG
Single and Double Rooms $163

Hilton Garden Inn Austin Downtown (Government Only)
500 North I H35, Austin, TX 78701
Single Rooms $104, Double Rooms $124
Government Reservations
https://aas.org/meetings/gov_hotel_reservation_form (You may see an untrusted certificate, please approve or accept.)
Phone Reservations: 202-328-2010 ext. 110

When you click the link you will be asked whether you trust this connection; please accept the connection and add the certificate to your browser. This will ensure that your data is transmitted to our server securely.

The government rate is intended for government employees required to reserve rooms at the per diem rate. Government ID will be required upon check-in. Please do not reserve a room at the government rate if you do not meet the requirements.

The Four Seasons
98 San Jacinto Boulevard, Austin, TX 78701
Toll free: 1-800-819-5053
Local: 512-478-4500
Group Reservations
https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=3506621&utm_source=3644&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=5172796
Single and Double Rooms: $185

Courtyard
300 East 4th Street, Austin, TX 78701
Reservations: 1-800-321-2211
Single and Double Rooms: $159

Residence Inn
300 East 4th Street, Austin, TX 78701
Reservations: 1-800-331-3131
Studio: $159
All reservation requests will require a credit card, a deposit for one
(1) room night.

The Radisson
111 East Cesar Chavez Street, Austin, TX 78701
Toll free: 1-800-333-3333
Local: 512-478-9611
Group Reservations
http://www.radisson.com/austin-hotel-tx-78701/txaustdt
Click More Search Options and enter the Reservation Code: AASAUS
Single and Double Rooms: $145
Suites: $175


1b. Program Ads

Increase your organization's visibility by placing an ad in the meeting program book. The inside (front or back) covers are available as well as full page ads throughout the program.

Pricing
Inside Covers (color): $2,500
Full Page Ad (black and white): $1,250

To secure an ad, please contact Debbie Kovalsky at kovalsky@aas.org by 17 November 2011.


1c. Austin Professional Development

AAS Meetings are a great place for Professional Development! Along with the AAS Career Center (http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/career_center), there will be many opportunities for attendees to learn about the Astronomy job market, cultivating professional skills, and even personal finance. For more information and details on the variety of professional development options at the Austin meeting, please visit www.astrobetter.com/professional-development-at-aas-219-in-austin/.


1d. Splinter Meetings

Please remember if you are requesting a splinter meeting to be held at the Austin meeting, you will need to submit a Splinter Meeting Proposal form by 1 December 2011. This form is available at http://aas.org/meetings/splinter_proposal_form.php. Splinter meetings are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis. Splinter meetings are typically small group meetings from 5 to 50 individuals to discuss mission planning, collaborative science efforts or other non-science issues. They are not meant to replace science sessions at the meeting and will not be widely advertised by the AAS as meeting content. The splinter meeting concept is provided as a service to our members.

Please direct questions to Lisa Idem at lisa.idem@aas.org.


1e. Austin Education Workshops

The full Austin schedule, including workshop descriptions is available
at http://www.abstractsonline.com/plan/start.aspx?mkey=%7B25369F54%2D5CB0%2D4639%2DBC20%2DB20273090B9A%7D

Getting Started in Astronomy Education Research
7 January, 9:30am-12:30pm
The cost for this workshop is $35. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Tim Slater, timslaterwyo@gmail.com

AAS's position statement In Support of Research in Astronomy Education strongly advocates that AAS members should be engaged and acknowledged for successfully engaging in astronomy education research and the scholarship of teaching because these efforts serve to improve pedagogical techniques and the evaluation of teaching. However, few AAS members have had the opportunity to pursue formal training in how to meaningfully engage in astronomy education research as an important scholarly endeavor. This participatory workshop for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students provides an introduction to the motivations, strategies, methodology, and publication routes for improving astronomy education through conducting and publishing rigorous science education research. Participants will evaluate the value of various education research questions, identify strengths and weaknesses of several research design methodologies, be introduced to sociological and behavior statistics used by education researchers, learn how to obtain Institutional Review Board approval to conduct education research on human subjects, and become more aware of how education research articles are successfully created for publication in journals such as the Astronomy Education Review. This workshop is facilitated by astronomy education researchers and AAS members, Stephanie Slater (CAPER Ctr for Astro & Phys Educ Research), and Tim Slater (U. Wyoming). Additional presenters will be invited to participate and all pre-registered participants will receive a copy of "Conducting Astronomy Education Research: A Primer" and "Discipline-based Education Research: A Scientists Guide."

AER Clinic: Robust Qualitative Research Methods
7 January, 2:00pm-5:00pm
The cost for this workshop is $35. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Tim Slater, timslaterwyo@gmail.com

Although large population statistical studies using surveys and concept inventories can reveal the range and domain of student understanding in astronomy, qualitative research methods are often the best approach for uncovering the underlying cognitive mechanisms students use when learning astronomy. This half-day "Astronomy Education Research (AER) Clinic" introduces participants to the nature, value, and strategies of interpretative research methodologies. A second-tier workshop for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students, the participatory, hands-on workshop teaches participants how to conduct systematic and rigorous qualitative research. Participants will practice interpretive techniques using qualitative data from ASTRO 101 students and learn how to prepare their results for publication in refereed journals, such as the Astronomy Education Review. Participants will evaluate the value of various education research questions, identify strengths and weaknesses of several research design methodologies. This workshop is facilitated by astronomy education researchers and AAS members, Stephanie Slater (CAPER Ctr for Astro & Phys Educ Research), and Tim Slater (U. Wyoming). Additional presenters will be invited to participate and all pre-registered participants will receive a copy of "Conducting Astronomy Education Research: A Primer" and "Discipline-based Education Research: A Scientists Guide."

CAE/CATS Astro 101 Tier 1 Teaching Excellence Workshop
7-8 January, 8:00am-5:30pm
The cost for this 2-day workshop is $45. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Gina Brissenden, gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu

The overarching goal of this workshop is for participants to become familiar with research-validated active engagement teaching strategies and assessment materials, as well as how to implement them in their college astronomy courses, through role-playing, modeling, practice, and more!

To accomplish this goal, participants in our workshop will learn how to create productive learning environments beginning with a brief review of research on the nature of teaching and learning. Most workshop time will be spent with participants playing the roles of student, instructor, and critical friend to practice implementing active engagement strategies such as interactive lectures, Think-Pair-Share, interactive demonstrations and videos, collaborative groups, Lecture-Tutorials, and Ranking Tasks. The workshop will culminate with participants learning how to put these teaching strategies together into effective learning sequences for the learner-centered classroom.

This workshop is designed for college instructors, post-docs, and graduate and undergraduate students currently teaching astronomy (or who think they will be in the near future).

CAE/CATS Tier II Technology Special Topic Workshop
8 January, 8:00am-5:30pm
The cost for this workshop is $35. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Gina Brissenden, gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu

Educational research has clearly defined the characteristics of the optimal introductory astronomy classroom one where students are actively engaged in the learning process and frequently receiving timely feedback on their learning progress. This CAE/CATS Tier 2 workshop will explore a variety of technologies that enable instructors to engage students and efficiently provide feedback.

Instructors will be trained and provided with curriculum materials from multiple NSF grants on computer simulations, computerized databases of Think-Pair-Share questions, and a library of animated ranking and sorting tasks. All materials will be disseminated through the web before the workshop and attendees will bring their own laptops with the software already installed.

Presented by Kevin Lee (University of Nebraska, Lincoln) and Edward Prather (University of Arizona).

Protecting Our Dark Skies
8 January, 9:00am-4:00pm
The cost for this workshop is $40. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Connie Walker, cwalker@noao.edu

Discover how to preserve dark skies while conserving energy through standards-based, immersive learning experiences illustrating responsible lighting, effects on wildlife, night-sky brightness measurements and more. The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) has created successful outreach programs on dark skies awareness to educate college and K-12 students through doing activities in classroom and evening sessions, holding star parties, providing downloadable resource materials on-line, and participating in international citizen science campaigns and photo contests. Many of the activities in the Dark Skies Rangers program (www.darkskiesawareness.org/DarkSkiesRangers/) address how light pollution affects issues on energy conservation, wildlife and health, in addition to preserving a dark night sky. In addition, the successful citizen-science campaign, GLOBE at Night (www.globeatnight.org) offers the opportunity to use of technology to take measurements of the night sky brightness and to follow up with research in areas affected by light pollution. The workshop will be facilitated by Dr. Connie Walker, other Education and Public Outreach staff at NOAO, International Dark-Sky Association staff and others dark skies awareness experts. We will present activities used, approaches taken, and lessons learned in working with various audiences. Dark Skies Education Kits will be available.

Teaching Every Student: Teaching Diverse Audiences
8 January, 9:00am-4:30pm
The cost for this workshop is $35. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Tim Slater, timslaterwyo@gmail.com

ASTRO 101 professors start each new year with increasingly diverse groups of students populating their classrooms. AAS members fully understand the value and importance of having a wide diversity of students who understand and contribute to the scientific enterprise; yet, few AAS members have had the opportunity to learn how to best teach contemporary student audiences in multi-cultural classrooms. Designed for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students, this full-day workshop uncovers the new challenges of effectively teaching today's diverse student bodies and provides experiences in using classroom-ready teaching strategies designed to engage all students. Much of the workshop is allocated to introducing scaffolding strategies that teach students to successfully engage in scientific thinking and design astronomy investigations by mining online astronomy databases. Participants in this workshop will learn how to structure effective student learning experiences using online resources such as the JPL's Solar System Simulator and GalaxyZoo portal access to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and. All participants and will receive copies of classroom-ready and classroom-tested inquiry teaching materials appropriate for a diversity of ASTRO 101 students. Additionally, participants will be shown how to make their own assignments based on the principles of a backwards faded scaffolding approach, developed by faculty at the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, CAPER. This workshop is facilitated by astronomy education researchers and AAS members, Stephanie Slater (CAPER Ctr for Astro & Phys Educ Research), Tim Slater (U. Wyoming), and Dan Lyons (University of Chicago). Additional presenters will be invited to participate. The workshop is sponsored by the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowment and participants are encouraged to bring their personal laptop computers.

Science Tools for Data-Intensive Astronomy
8 January, 12:00pm-5:00pm
The cost for this workshop is $35. Workshop registration can be completed through the AAS registration form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/aas219/registration.
Organizer: Robert Hanisch, hanisch@stsci.edu

Full exploitation of the multi-wavelength suite of ground- and space-based telescopes increasingly requires integration and joint analysis of the images, spectra, and catalogs. New time domain observational techniques also require new services and tools for coordinating observations and examining the data. The scale of data is both growing rapidly, and the rate of increase is expected to continue rising. These data-intensive aspects of astronomy were captured in the concept of "cyber-discovery" in the New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey. Moreover, proposals to both NSF and NASA now require discussion of a "data management plan."

Session 1 is aimed at research astronomers, in which Virtual Observatory (VO) tools and services will be demonstrated in the context of a range of science use cases and tutorials. These use cases and tutorials will include constructing and modeling spectral energy distributions, cross-matching objects from diverse catalogs, exploration of time series data, and image analysis tools.

Session 2 is "The Virtual Observatory in the Classroom" and is aimed at educators, in which the VO will be illustrated in the context of providing access to astronomical data in the classroom. The VO is well-positioned to teach STEM-based subjects using real astronomical data from more than 30 world-class telescopes. Efforts are already underway to identify secondary school teachers and community college educators in the Austin area regarding this workshop. Participants will have the opportunity to provide feedback, particularly in the EPO sense for standards-based education.

This workshop is organized and sponsored by the Virtual Astronomical Observatory. Financial assistance may be available for those that qualify. Please contact Marie Huffman at mhuffman@aui.edu.


1f. Volunteers Needed for Austin Meeting

The American Astronomical Society is looking for volunteers to help out at the 219th Meeting in Austin, TX. We love getting help from undergrads, grads, postdocs, and local amateur astronomers at our meetings: to supervise sessions, help at registration, usher at events, and various other odd (but greatly appreciated) jobs. This is a great chance to meet and mingle with your peers, get up to date on the newest science, and pick up some cool freebies in the Exhibit Hall.

Volunteers that sign up to work a minimum of 16 hours will receive complimentary meeting registration, volunteer t-shirts, access to the Exhibit Hall and all the sessions, and to the Opening Reception. We will also provide complimentary lunch on the days you work.

If you would like to volunteer for the 219th Meeting, please fill out the Volunteer Availability Form, available at http://aas.org/meetings/volunteer_form.

Questions can be directed to annette.williams@aas.org.


2. ANCHORAGE MEETING SPECIAL SESSION AND TOWN HALL PROPOSAL DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 1 DECEMBER!

It is not too late to submit a Special Session or Town Hall proposal for the 220th AAS Meeting in Anchorage, AK!

If you would like to propose for a Special Session or Town Hall for the 2012 Summer Meeting in Anchorage, AK proposals and room requests are now due 1 December 2011. See
http://aas.org/meetings/summer_session_organizer_deadlines.php for information and organizer deadlines.

We are also accepting workshop proposals for the 2012 Summer Meeting in Anchorage, AK. Proposals are due 15 December 2011. To submit a proposal visit http://aas.org/meetings/splinter_proposal_form.php.

Please direct proposal questions to lisa.idem@aas.org.


3. AAS ELECTRONIC VOTING

The AAS conducts online elections. When balloting opens, each eligible AAS member with a valid email address on file will receive an emailed request to vote. Voting will be accomplished through the "members-only" area of the AAS website which requires your ID and password. Members for whom we do not have email addresses will receive a paper ballot by mail.

Any other member wishing to use a paper ballot may request one by fax to (202) 234-2560 or by email to ballot at aas.org. Please include your member number with your request.


4. AAS JOURNAL REPRINTS GO DIGITAL ONLY

Beginning with the 2012 volumes, high-quality digital copies of papers will be available for all authors of articles published in the AJ and the ApJ. A high-resolution PDF will be available on authors' home pages on IOP's authors site. The high-resolution version can be used by authors to make their own high-quality paper reprints in any quantity on any paper at any time they wish. At the same time the journals make these digital files available, the journals will discontinue production of paper offprints.


5. SMALL RESEARCH GRANT DEADLINE

The Small Research Grant (SmRG) Program is administered by the AAS Executive Office. The program is funded by a grant from NASA and is thus intended mainly to support investigators in the U.S. working on NASA-relevant projects. A small amount of additional funding may be provided by income from the AAS operating-reserve fund to support particularly meritorious proposals from outside the U.S. and/or not strictly relevant to current or future NASA missions. The amount of money available during any proposal cycle depends on the sources of support available to the Society at that time.

Completed proposals are due in the AAS Executive Office by 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time on 28 November 2011 for funds to be awarded in early 2012.

http://aas.org/grants/smrg.php


6. IAU SYMPOSIA DEADLINE FOR 2013

The deadline for the submission of Proposals for IAU Symposia for calendar year 2013 is 1 December 2011. Please see http://www.iau.org/science/meetings/proposals/lop/

If you plan to organize a Symposium here in the US, the AAS Meeting Services team is prepared to take care of the logistics so you and your co-organizers can focus on the science.

Contact us at kim.earle@aas.org for more information.


7. NEEDED: JUDGES FOR CHAMBLISS STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

The AAS Executive Office seeks members to judge posters for the Chambliss Astronomy Achievement Student Awards at the Austin meeting. Volunteers will be asked to evaluate no more than five undergraduate- and/or graduate-student posters according to defined criteria; see the rules (http://aas.org/grants/Chambliss_Astronomy_Achievement_Student_Award_Rules.php)
on our website. Attention junior members: Advanced graduate students who have finished their coursework and are working on their dissertation research are now eligible to judge undergraduate posters.

Student poster authors will sincerely appreciate your expertise in judging their work. Judging will occur on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday (January 9, 10, and 11) from 9:30-11:30 a.m., 1:00-3:00 p.m., and 3:00-5:00 p.m. Each poster will be assigned to one date and time slot.

Please indicate your willingness and availability by filling out the Chambliss Judge Sign-Up Form (http://aas.org/meetings/chambliss_judge_sign_up_form) by Friday, 18 November 2011. Please contact Crystal Tinch (crystal@aas.org) if you have any questions.


8. JOB CAREER CENTER

The AAS hosts a Job Career Center at winter meetings. It is a place for job seekers to find jobs and interview for jobs. Employers also advertise their jobs and interview job candidates. There is no cost to participate in the job center.

Employers: If you are planning to conduct interviews or have questions about the Career Center, please let us know. Send your name, institution and position for which you will be interviewing or your questions to jobs@aas.org. Also, take note of the networking events scheduled during the meeting for graduate students and postdocs.

Job Seekers: To participate in the Career Center, please submit your resume and cover sheet to jobs@aas.org at the AAS Executive Office by 15 December 2011.

More information on the AAS Career center is available on our website http://jobregister.aas.org/career_center


9. ASTRONOMY FOR DEVELOPMENT

The IAU is establishing a new activity dubbed "Astronomy for Development" and has established the office for this activity in South Africa. A workshop is being held 12-14 December 2011 to discuss how organizations, institutes and astronomy departments can contribute to this global effort. A link to a workshop announcement is provided here: http://iau.org/static/education/oad/message_to_organisations_sep2011.pdf


10. AAS MEMBER BENEFIT: HERTZ CAR RENTALS

Beat the Holiday rush and reserve your rentals now through the end of the year. Use the following corporate discount number (CDP#1924477) and promotional codes (PC Codes) for discounts on rentals that will be returned before 31 December 2011.

These discounts are available for all vehicles.

http://www.hertz.com/

PC113761 up to $25 off week/weekend
PC156586 $40 off weekly one-way
PC156601 $10 off weekend one-way
PC161556 1 free weekend day NO airport
PC161416 $50 off monthly


11. JWST PROGRAMMATIC UPDATE

In September the James Webb Space Telescope program officially concluded its nearly year-long process of replanning in response to the Independent Comprehensive Review Panel report of November 2010 (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/499224main_JWST-ICRP_Report-FINAL.pdf). The restructuring of program management along with a revised schedule and budget through launch and commissioning (NASA phases A through D) were completed and approved in early August. A revision of the operations portion of the mission (Phase E in NASA parlance) was conducted in late August. Numerous briefings to the astronomical community at American Astronomical Society meetings, NASA Astrophysics Subcommittee meetings (http://science.nasa.gov/science-committee/subcommittees/nac-astrophysics-subcommittee/), along with JWST website archives at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) (http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/publications.html), Space Telescope Science Institute (http://www.stsci.edu/jwst/doc-archive/presentations) and AURA, Inc. (http://www.aura-astronomy.org/news/jwst.asp) document the changes that have been put in place. Though the scientific capabilities of the mission remain unchanged, the new launch date is October 2018. The cost to build, launch and commission the observatory is $8B, as reported in the Summer. Five years of operations and 2 additional years of data analysis are approximately $837M, for a total lifecycle cost of $8.835B. It should be noted that the facility is not necessarily limited to 5 years of operations, but that is the top level mission requirement. The observatory will contain sufficient consumables to operate for approximately 10 years.

The coming year promises to be a busy one for the JWST program as we complete the final cryogenic tests of the last six segments of the primary mirror by mid December and begin to take delivery of the flight science instruments. The instruments will join up with the integrated science instrument module at GSFC which is already in its integration and test phase.

As the government proceeds with the fiscal year 2012 (and then the fiscal year 2013) budget process please keep in mind the most accurate and up-to-date status about Webb programmatic information (budgets, schedules, policies, etc.) can be obtained by contacting the JWST Program Office at NASA Headquarters directly. The Program Director is Rick Howard (Richard.J.Howard@nasa.gov) and the Deputy Program Director is Eric Smith (Eric.P.Smith@nasa.gov).


12. NSO OBSERVING PROPOSAL DEADLINE 15 NOVEMBER 2011

The current deadline for submitting observing proposals to the National Solar Observatory is 15 November 2011 for the first quarter of 2012. Information is available from the NSO Telescope Allocation Committee at P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 for Sacramento Peak facilities (sp@nso.edu) or P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 for Kitt Peak facilities (kptac@nso.edu). Instructions may be found at http://www.nso.edu/general/observe/. A web-based observing-request form is at http://www2.nso.edu/cgi-bin/nsoforms/obsreq/obsreq.cgi. Users' Manuals are available at http://nsosp.nso.edu/dst/ for the SP facilities and http://nsokp.nso.edu/ for the KP facilities. An
observing-run evaluation form can be obtained at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/observing_templates/evaluation.form.txt.

Proposers are reminded that each quarter is typically oversubscribed, and it is to the proposer's advantage to provide all information requested to the greatest possible extent no later than the official deadline. Observing time at National Observatories is provided as support to the astronomical community by the National Science Foundation.


13. KAVLI PRIZE 2012 NOMINATIONS

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters hereby calls for nominations of candidates for the Kavli Prize 2012.

Nomination deadline is: 1 December 2011.

This is a follow-up to the letter you received by regular mail in September. We hope you will consider nominating candidates for The Kavli Prize in Astrophysics, Nanoscience and Neuroscience. For further information on how and where to nominate, please consult: www.kavliprize.no


14. CARMA CALL FOR SEMESTER 2012A OBSERVING PROPOSALS

CARMA, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, is accepting observing proposals for its 2012A semester, which will extend from 27 February 2012 to 6 August 2012. For the 2012A semester, proposals will be accepted for the 23-element array (with receivers for 3mm wavelengths), as well as for subarrays of 15 antennas (1mm & 3mm) and 8 antennas (3mm & 1cm). Approximately 30% of the observing time will be awarded to PIs outside the CARMA partner universities.

In addition to regular proposals, CARMA seeks Key Projects that are of sufficient scope and potential scientific impact to justify a significant investment of CARMA resources. Key Projects that complement ALMA or lead to follow-up programs with ALMA are encouraged. A Key Project can request any combination of standard antenna configurations for up to 1000 hours of observing time spread over 1 to 5 semesters. In addition to the science and technical justifications, the proposal must outline a plan for the management, production, and distribution of science-quality data products. CARMA anticipates running 1-3 Key Projects concurrently. Additional information on CARMA Key Projects can be found at http://www.mmarray.org, then following the link on the main page.

Proposals should be submitted using the electronic form at: http.//carma-prop.astro.illinois.edu. Detailed information about CARMA, including tools to assist you in preparing proposals, is available at http://www.mmarray.org.

The deadline for submitting proposals is 17:00 CST on 5 December 2011.


15. VISITING SCIENTISTS IN ASTROPHYSICS AT NASA HQ

NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) seeks one or more experienced scientists to fill visiting scientist positions within the Astrophysics Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. These are two-year positions, extendible to six years, filled by scientists who take leave from their home institution. Positions are available in the following science areas: physics of the cosmos (exploring the fundamental physics of the universe and the extremes of space- time); cosmic origins (the origins and evolution of stars, galaxies, and cosmic structure); exoplanet exploration (the search for and characterization of extra-solar planetary systems and potentially habitable environments around other stars); and in astrophysics research and technology programs that cut across these science areas. At this time, expertise in astrophysics theory and exoplanet exploration is particularly of interest.

Visiting scientists participate primarily in the management of the Astrophysics grants programs, and also the planning, development, and management of NASA missions. They serve as Discipline Scientists to develop research solicitations, conduct scientific peer reviews, and recommend highly rated proposals for selection, and serve as Program Scientists for NASA space missions. Visiting scientists play a leadership role in developing budgets and program plans, in designing and participating in E/PO activities, and in long-range strategic plans to define the future NASA astrophysics program. They can make a difference in the execution of the overall SMD science mission, and are expected to demonstrate a high degree of initiative in doing so.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent in astronomy or physics, plus relevant experience in instrumental, observational, or theoretical research. They should be familiar with NASA grants programs, and be abie to communicate effectively with the scientific community, educators, and the media. Visiting scientists are normally funded via an Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) agreement with their home institution, which requires current employment with a US institution.

Positions are available beginning in April 2012, though the starting date is negotiable. Interested scientists should send a curriculum vitae and cover letter by 15 January 2012 to Sheila Gorham, preferably by e-mail at sgorham@nasa.gov, or at Mail Stop 3Y28, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 300 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546. Please contact Sheila Gorham at 202-358-0032 for answers to questions.


16. INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH EXPERIENCE FOR US GRADUATE STUDENTS (IRES)

This program is administered by the National Solar Observatory (NSO), sponsored by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE), and is open to US graduate students in any discipline of astronomy or astrophysics who are US citizens or permanent residents, age 21 years or older, and have a passport. The main goal of the program is to expose potential researchers to an international setting at an early stage in their careers. The program will take place in Bangalore, India, under the auspices of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), a premier national center devoted to research in astronomy, astrophysics and related physics.

The program supports up to six summer research positions for eight weeks starting 13 June 2012 (this start date is firm). For each participant, the program will provide a stipend of US $500 per week, round-trip air travel to/from India, accommodation, miscellaneous travel (field trips), incidental expenses, and medical expenses/insurance.

Additional information and application materials are available on the Web at http://eo.nso.edu/ires/. All application materials must be received by 31 January 2012.


17. BRACEWELL RADIO SUNDIAL

A not-for-profit group is organizing an effort to construct a radio sundial at the VLA in memory of Ron Bracewell and for education and public outreach activities. Composed of components from the Bracewell spectroheliograph, a fundraising effort is underway to support the endeavor. For more information see: http://www.razoo.com/story/Bracewell


18. AAS SEEKS VOLUNTEER FOR USNC REPRESENTATIVE TO URSI

The AAS may nominate a designated representative to URSI from the US National Committee of the IAU. The group meets once a year in Boulder Colorado at the National Radio Science Meeting. URSI supports extensive activities focused on providing opportunity to and engaging students in the radio sciences and the AAS USNC/URSI representative can play an important role. If you are interested in serving the AAS as the representative to this important committee, please contact AAS Secretary Fritz Benedict by email: aassec@aas.org


Follow AAS Public Policy online at blog.aas.org or on Twitter: @AAS_CAPP or @AAS_Bethany_J

Stay on top of astronomy news by following the AAS Press Officer on Twitter: @AAS_Press

An American Astronomical Society (AAS) Electronic Announcement is mailed to all members around the 10th of each month. Included are important items that do not fit into the schedule of the AAS Newsletter. Because of volume, Meeting Announcements are generally not included.

Items for possible inclusion in this Announcement series should be sent to crystal@aas.org. Keep announcements short and refer readers to sources of additional information.

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