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AAS Electronic Announcement #156 -- December 2005

[Mailed from aas.org on 12 December 2005]

CONTENTS:

  1. 2005 MEMBERSHIP RENEWALS
  2. NRAO JANKSY LECTURESHIP
  3. JOINT OBSERVING PROPOSALS ON NASA'S GREAT OBSERVATORIES
  4. NON-ACADEMIC ASTRONOMERS NETWORK
  5. LMT HEAVY CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED
  6. CLOSING OF THE FCRAO 14 METER TELESCOPE

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1. 2005 MEMBERSHIP RENEWALS

Reminder notices will be mailed this week to members with outstanding renewals as of 10 December 2005.

If you mailed your renewal within the last two weeks, please do not respond to the Reminder Notice. You may ensure receipt at a later date by visiting the Members Only pages at members.aas.org and confirming the Paid Thru Date in your Members Only Directory record is 12/31/2006.

If you have not yet renewed, please remit your payment immediately for arrival and processing by 31 December 2005.
Prompt cooperation will preempt service interruptions, reinstatement fees and back issue surcharges. Questions regarding your renewal status should be directed to mailto:peterson@aas.org or (301) 328-2010.
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2. NRAO JANKSY LECTURESHIP
Deadline: 1 February 2006

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory invites nominations for the 2006 Jansky Lectureship [http://www.nrao.edu/jansky/janskyprize.shtml].
The Karl G. Jansky Lectureship is an honor established by the trustees of Associated Universities, Inc., to recognize outstanding contributions to the advancement of astronomy. First awarded in 1966, it is named in honor of Karl G. Jansky who, in 1932, first detected radio waves from a cosmic source.

Please send nominations, including a supporting paragraph, by 1 February 2006, via e-mail to mailto:brodrigu@nrao.edu or via regular mail to the Billie Rodriguez, NRAO Director's Office, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475.
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3. JOINT OBSERVING PROPOSALS ON NASA'S GREAT OBSERVATORIES

With three of NASA's Great Observatories operating (Chandra, Hubble, Spitzer), there is a very special window of opportunity for observing programs requiring more than one of these telescopes. Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer offer joint time allocation to observe on two or three of the Great Observatories with a single proposal, evaluated by a single Time Allocation Committee (TAC). In addition each of the Great Observatories also offers joint time programs with major ground-based optical/IR and radio observatories.

With the finite cryogenic lifetime of Spitzer and the aging of the other Great Observatories, this window of opportunity is very short (perhaps 3 more years for the Spitzer component). All members of the science community are encouraged to capitalize on this unique opportunity for projects which require observations from multiple telescopes and fit within the time allocated for joint projects.

The joint time allocation categories were designed to ensure that the best projects that require observing time on more than one of NASA's Great Observatories (or with one space observatory and a ground-based observatory) can be selected in a timely manner and receive the required time without going through the process of submitting proposals to multiple TACs.

The details of the program can be found in the Call for Proposals released by each of the Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer Observatories.

See:

http://cxc.harvard.edu/proposer/CfP/

http://www.stsci.edu/hst/proposing/docs/cycle15announce

http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/propkit/currentcp.html
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4. NON-ACADEMIC ASTRONOMERS NETWORK

The Employment Committee of the AAS invites you and your friends to join the non-academic astronomers' network if you received a degree in astronomy and went on to a non-academic career. Please join the network by visiting the website at <http://www.aas.org/career/nonacademic/index.html>
or email us at mailto:industry@aas.org. It's a great way to network with others like you and to mentor younger students and postdocs who might be weighing their career options.

Grad students and network members - Please join us at the Graduate Student Reception on Tuesday evening at the January AAS meeting to share experiences and learn about various career paths. For more information, contact mailto:anitak@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov.
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5. LMT HEAVY CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED

On 19 November 2005, the Large Millimeter Telescope Project achieved a major milestone when the the 400 ton backup structure was lifted as a single unit onto the alidade base. Photographs of this event can be viewed at http://www.lmtgtm.org. The lift concludes the heavy steel construction phase of the facility. Initial commissioning of the drive motors is expected to begin in early 2006.

The next major construction steps are the fabrication and installation of surface panels onto the backup structure and further development of the site infrastructure. When these construction efforts are complete, radiometric commissioning of the facility can begin.

The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) is a major new astronomical facility being constructed through a collaboration between the U.S. and Mexico on the 15,000 ft summit of Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico.
When completed, the LMT 50 meter telescope will be the world's most sensitive instrument operating within the
0.8-3 mm band enabling pioneering investigations of galaxy formation and evolution, star formation, and the Solar System. The lead institutions are the University of Massachusetts in the U.S. and the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica in Mexico.
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6. CLOSING OF THE FCRAO 14 METER TELESCOPE

While excited about the backstructure lift and the future scientific prospects of the LMT, the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory announces that scientific operations of the 14 meter telescope in New Salem, Massachusetts will cease in January 2006.

The facility, which opened in 1976, has played a major role in studies of the molecular interstellar medium in the Milky Way and other galaxies. It has been an invaluable training ground for students, postdocs, and young faculty.
Over the last 10 years, it had focused upon imaging surveys of molecular line emission within the 3mm band with the world's largest heterodyne focal plane array receiver.

These data, along with other programs within the FCRAO archive, will extend the rich scientific legacy of the 14m telescope for many years beyond its operation phase.
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